Jimmy

  • Were you atWere you at the ABR Festival 2019…?centerno-repeat;left top;;autojhxn9ptUvYQ700400Were you atWell great news. After the successful collaboration between TRF volunteers and ABR we’ll be back again in […]

  • Eleven TRF members turned up on a wet and windy Saturday morning to clear vegetation from an overgrown byway near Basingstoke in Hampshire.
    Wootton St. Lawrence 9 had become quite ‘scratchy’, which was pre […]

  • Eleven TRF members turned up on a wet and windy Saturday morning to clear vegetation from an overgrown byway near Basingstoke in Hampshire.

    Wootton St. Lawrence 9 had become quite ‘scratchy’, which was pre […]

  • Did you know that Teeside & North Yorkshire group organise an annual coast-to-coast ride between Scarborough and Morecambe?

    Many of you of course will have ridden the route in either direction over the course […]

  • Jimmy's profile was updated 2 years, 6 months ago

  • Last weekend North Wales TRF donated £1,080 to Wales Air Ambulance.

    The group raised the money through their March Moon and Dolgellau guided trail riding weekends earlier in the year.

    Pictured are Alison […]

  • Sorry Peter, but your comment reads to me as though your failure to heed the rider’s instruction contributed to the subsequent dismount. The Highway Code advises to follow their instruction for good reason, namely that they understand their horse best.

    A frank exchange of views may well have been beneficial.

  • Isn’t it funny how we only remember the negative encounters? A confirmation bias, no doubt.

  • Last year the TRF asked a selection of our members for their thoughts about horses being ridden on public roads. As you might expect, this prompted a lively debate. Of the 137 people who responded:

    9.5% (13) […]

    • The worst, most idiotic behaviour I have ever seen from horse riders was when I encountered a group of female riders on a tarmac lane.
      I could see among them a tiny child on a pony who looked hopelessly unskilled, so stopped the bike and took my helmet off. The girl started screaming “On my god, mummy, a motorbike” and her pony then locked up.
      The women told the girl to dismount, then dragged the pony past while hitting it with a stick
      The ‘mummy’ said to me…”Oh, I do wish you wouldn’t ride motorbikes, the pony hates them.”
      “Why is that a surprise?” I asked. “I’d hate them too, if you were hitting me like that.”

      That said…I actually find horse riders the most friendly/accepting user group on the lanes.

      • Isn’t it funny how we only remember the negative encounters? A confirmation bias, no doubt.

        • No, as I’ve said I’ve had far more positive interaction with horsey types than any other…but that particular group just struck me as idiots. Besides the wisdom of putting a child far too young to drive in charge of an animal which was likely to be spooked by motorbikes on a public road, their way of ‘dealing’ with the situation could only make things worse. And, no doubt, by the time they had got around the corner they had decided that it was all my fault. I take more care with my dogs than they took with the pony or the child.

      • I must say that 99.99% of horse riders I encounter [on or off trail] are happy and friendly but there is always the exception. Some years ago I was riding a tarmac road, two vehicles wide, when coming towards were three horses in ‘line astern’ formation. I slowed right down and took to the wide grass verge on my side. The leading rider, a man, started to shouting at me to stop and turn off my engine – ridiculous – I rode on very slowly and as quietly and far away as possible. The second rider, a woman, just raised her eyebrows at me as if to say ‘ignore the prat in front. The third rider, also a man, completely lost control, was thrown off, and the horse fell over. The leading rider, the prat, then shouted at me ” look, see what you’ve done” I very nearly pulled him off his horse and ‘explained’ a few things to him but then I though it really wouldn’t help matters as he was obviously to stupid to understand. Clearly the rear most rider was incapable of controlling his horse and the horse was not used to traffic of any kind. He should just not have been on the main road. If a car had come past not slowing down I hate to think what would have happened. There are a lot of really nice friendly horse riders around and it’s a joy to pass the time of day with them but there are also the complete morons who shouldn’t be out without a keeper.

        • Sorry Peter, but your comment reads to me as though your failure to heed the rider’s instruction contributed to the subsequent dismount. The Highway Code advises to follow their instruction for good reason, namely that they understand their horse best.

          A frank exchange of views may well have been beneficial.

          • Sorry Jimmy, how could you possibly know? You weren’t there!

            Firstly, the road was around 6 meters wide with another 8 meters of level grass verge on my side. I was, therefore, a good 10 meters away from the horses, on a very quiet bike and in bottom gear. I’m used to riding among horses, I have been assisting at horse trials for 20 years. I defy any trail rider to have shown more consideration than I did.

            Secondly, they [the horse riders] were on a road that is usually quiet but any traffic using it could, quite reasonably, be doing 30 to 40 mph quite safely and, sure they might have slowed down, but not to give the consideration that I gave. The rear horse rider should just not have been riding. If he had no option but to be on that road he should have been walking and leading the horse. Or are you suggesting that horse riders don’t need to take responsibility for themselves?

            Thirdly, Highway Code rule 52 says that the horse rider should ‘make sure you can control your horse’

            Fourthly, the Highway Code rule 215 that you refer to is to ‘heed request to slow down or stop’ It wasn’t a request – it was a shouted demand and an unreasonable one given the distance I was away from them.

            Fifthly, I’ve been trail riding all my adult life [50 years] so I know all about meeting horses and if I meet them off tarmac on a boat etc I always stop and switch off my engine as a matter of course, almost by instinct, so I don’t need anyone [horse rider or whoever] to tell my what to do.

            Finally, a ‘frank exchange of views’ was not an option as the lead rider was in such a rage that a shouting match was all he was capable of. It was probably his shouting that spooked the horse!

            Sorry Jimmy, but your comments are not accepted.

    • Stephen, I did “deal with the situation at the time” I’m not “moaning on” and I have “moved on”

      I had forgotten all about the incident until I read the current conversation; I was only contributing. Positively, not critically.

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